Edorium Journal of

Dentistry

 
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Review Article
 
Surgically-based methods to modify orthodontic tooth movement: A literature review
María Cadenas de Llano-Pérula1, Alejandro Iglesias-Linares2
1PhD, DDS, MOrth, Department of Orthodontics UZ Leuven, Katholiek Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
2PhD, DDS, MOrth, Department of Orthodontics Complutense University of Madrid, Spain.

Article ID: 100008D01ML2015
doi:10.5348/D01-2015-8-OA-6

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How to cite this article
Cadenas de Llano-Perula M, Iglesias-Linares A. Surgically-based methods to modify orthodontic tooth movement: A literature review. Edorium J Dent 2015;2:35–42.


Abstract
Aim: Reducing treatment time in orthodontics is a matter of strong interest for clinicians and patients. Many procedures have been reported in literature in the last years intending to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement by modifying its biological substrate. Among them, surgical techniques are becoming increasingly popular. The aim of the present article is to review these surgical techniques, offering a clear idea of the scientific evidence available in literature and the possible implications of these techniques in the future.
Methods: A literature search was performed in the databases MedLine and Scopus, including all article types focused on surgically-based methods to modify tooth movement in combination with orthodontic or orthopedic force.
Results: Osteotomy, corticotomy and piezocision are the most representative of the so-called 'surgically facilitated orthodontic techniques (SFOTs)'. Corticotomy and piezocision share the same biological background (Regional acceleratory phenomena or RAP) while osteotomy is based on osteogenic distraction. A historical overview and a description of the techniques are included in the text.
Conclusion: Although clinical results are promising, most of the articles concerning SFOTs are studies performed on animals or case reports. There is a need for evidence-based reports and standardized protocols in order to clarify the process behind tooth movement secondary to surgery, biologically speaking. Side effects of the surgeries and stability of the orthodontic treatment on mid to long-term are yet insufficiently reported.

Keywords: Corticotomy, Orthodontic tooth movement, Piezocision, (SFOTs) Surgically-facilitated orthodontic techniques

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Author Contributions
Maria Cadenas de LLano-Pérula – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Alejandro Iglesias-Linares – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of support
None
Conflict of interest
Authors declare no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2015 Maria Cadenas de LLano-Perula et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.



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